Innovative, Independent, Inclusive

The Birkbeck Institute for the Study of Antisemitism is a centre of innovative research and teaching on antisemitism, racialization and religious intolerance. It contributes to knowledge and understanding, policy formation and public debate.

What's On

Seminars, conferences, workshops, public lectures

Study

Public courses, undergraduate and postgraduate teaching, MPhil/PhDs

Resources

Books, essays, reports, comment, podcasts

Research

Projects, partnerships, networks, fellowships

Latest Update: Welcome to the Birkbeck Institute for the Study of Antisemitism website. Browse our podcasts, research and events.

WORLD LEADING EXPERTISE

Birkbeck Institute for the Study of Antisemitism

The Birkbeck Institute for the Study of Antisemitism was established in 2010 by Birkbeck, University of London and Pears Foundation.   

We are the only university centre in the UK dedicated to the study of antisemitism and one of only two in Europe. The Institute is renowned internationally for its innovative research and teaching. 

Our work is framed by our conviction that antisemitism is a distinctive form of racism. Through our research and public activity we establish points of connection between the problem of antisemitism and the challenge of racisms more broadly. 

Our scholarship contributes to public debate on antisemitism, racialization and religious intolerance and we provide expertise and advice to a wide range of institutions in the UK, Europe and the wider world.    

The Birkbeck Institute for the Study of Antisemitism is both independent and inclusive. 

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Activity

What's On

Making and Remaking the Jewish East End: Space, Language and Time

Making and Remaking the Jewish East End: Space, Language and Time

David Feldman, Vivi Lachs, Katy Pettit, Nadia Valman

This interdisciplinary research project brings together a team of historians and literary scholars working in English and Yiddish, and two archives, the Jewish Museum London and the Tower Hamlets Local History Library and Archive to explore, through new sources and approaches, the multi-relational character of Jewish immigrant culture in 19th and 20th century London.

Holocaust Memory in Eastern Europe

HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL LECTURE 2023

30th January, 2023

Holocaust Memory in Eastern Europe

Jelena Subotic, Georgia State University

In this lecture, Professor Subotic will explore the ways in which the memory of the Holocaust in post-communist Eastern Europe has been used to represent other types of historical crimes. Specifically, she will examine the extent to which this instrumentalization of Holocaust memory has fed the rise of nationalized, particularized, and populist remembrance practices, and has helped produce a crisis in Holocaust memory globally. 

Racialization of Disease: The Typhus-Epidemic, Antisemitism and Closed Borders in German Occupied Poland, 1915–1918

This article analyses German responses to the typhus epidemic in German-occupied Poland during WWI and shows the close connection between health policies and antisemitic and nationalist ideological narratives and projects.

Jan Rybak identifies this racialization of disease as a key moment in the development of German antisemitism.

The Politics of Memory and the Return of the Xenophobic Right

SEMINAR SERIES | ANTISEMITISM NOW

20th October, 2022

The Politics of Memory and the Return of the Xenophobic Right

Valentina Pisanty, University of Bergamo

In this seminar Valentina Pisanty asks whether over the last twenty years the simultaneous growth of Holocaust memorialisation and racism are two independent historical threads, or whether there is a connection between them? She asks whether a society which wishes to oppose the current wave of xenophobia should examine this contradiction?

No Englishman did it: Jews, the News, and the Whitechapel Murders of 1888

Public Event

24th October, 2022

No Englishman did it: Jews, the News, and the Whitechapel Murders of 1888

Mia Spiro, University of Glasgow

This lecture looks at popular suspicions that Jack the Ripper was a Jewish migrant and the reactions to these accusations among Jews. By looking at contemporary reportage in newspapers we will see how readers and writers used print media to draw attention to the boundaries between ‘Englishman’ and foreigner, fact and fiction, and the limits of religious certitude in the face of inexplicable evil. 

“A Foul and Violent Orgy”: James Baldwin on Holocaust Exceptionalism and Black Revolt

Black History Month | Seminar for Scholars

31st October, 2022

“A Foul and Violent Orgy”: James Baldwin on Holocaust Exceptionalism and Black Revolt

Ben Ratskoff, Hebrew Union College and the University of Southern California

In James Baldwin’s protracted and ambivalent engagement with Holocaust history and memory in the 1960s, Baldwin coded moral orientations toward the Holocaust to political orientations toward Black oppression and revolt.

Professor David Feldman, Director – 4

Our work shows how antisemitism has often been intertwined with anti-Muslim, anti-migrant, anti-black and anti-Irish bigotries. Antisemitism and other racisms should not be considered in isolation and still less in competition.

Professor David Feldman, Director

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