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Seminar Series

Active
Race, Religion and Difference in the Nineteenth Century

October 2021 – July 2022

Race, Religion and Difference in the Nineteenth Century

In collaboration with the Centre for Nineteenth Century Studies at Durham/Newcastle and Northumbria Universities

This interdisciplinary seminar programme explores how multiple discourses on race and religion intersected in the global nineteenth century, and generated, reinforced and/or challenged notions of human difference.

Antisemitism and Racism – Comparisons and Contexts

This academic year our seminar programme, under the rubric ‘Antisemitism and Racism - Comparisons and Contexts’, focuses on some of the historical and contemporary issues connecting (and separating) anti-antisemitism and anti-racism. This theme seems ever more urgent, not least in the context of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Jews, Money, Myth

March 2019 - October 2019

Jews, Money, Myth

In collaboration with Jewish Museum London

Jews, Money, Myth, a major exhibition, explored the role of money in Jewish life and its vexed place in relations between Jews and non-Jews, from the time of Jesus to the 21st century. The Institute held a series of  public lectures and film screenings, as well as a workshop for scholars, which explored themes from the exhibition.

Blood – Uniting and Dividing

November 2015 - February 2016

Blood – Uniting and Dividing

In collaboration with Jewish Museum London

This cutting-edge exhibition considers the real and symbolic links between Christians and Jews and confronts some of the most difficult issues surrounding Jewish culture and identity: the rite of circumcision, the slander of the blood libel, and ideas of the Jewish ‘race’ and of racial purity. A series of events explored themes from the exhibition.

Professor David Feldman, Director – 2

In an age of populism and nationalism it is more important than ever to understand the connections between antisemitism and other forms of racialization.

Professor David Feldman, Director

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