ACTIVITY

What's On

The Birkbeck Institute for the Study of Antisemitism holds seminars, workshops and conferences for scholars, and lectures, discussions and film screenings that are open to everyone.

Jewish soldiers, Nazi captors – what was it like to be a Jewish POW in a Nazi camp?

Seminar | For Scholars

23rd January, 2024

Jewish soldiers, Nazi captors – what was it like to be a Jewish POW in a Nazi camp?

Yorai Linenberg, Birkbeck Institute for the Study of Antisemitism, University of London

In this seminar, Dr Yorai Linenberg explores the lives of American and British Jewish POWs throughout their time in Nazi captivity, from the moment of capture – facing the decision whether to declare themselves as Jews – to their personal experiences of daily life in the POW camps.

What’s in a name? From ‘The Final Solution of the Jewish Question’ to ‘The Holocaust’

HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL LECTURE 2024

30th January, 2024

What’s in a name? From ‘The Final Solution of the Jewish Question’ to ‘The Holocaust’

Jane Caplan, St Antony’s College, University of Oxford

How did the Nazis’ attempt to annihilate the Jews of Europe come to be known as ‘The Holocaust’? Professor Jane Caplan will examine the terms used to name Nazi policies and practices. She will demonstrate how the language we use is tightly entangled in the sort of research historians undertake and the interpretations they offer. 

The conflict over the conflict: the Israel/Palestine debate on US campuses, and the implications for free speech and academic freedom

Since the Hamas attacks of 7 October, some US campuses have been in the midst of controversy. In this seminar, Kenneth S. Stern asks what’s going on, and what should be done? 

From right to left and in between: Jew-hatred across the political divide

Public Lecture

21st February, 2024

From right to left and in between: Jew-hatred across the political divide

Ambassador Deborah E. Lipstadt, U.S. Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Antisemitism

In this lecture, Ambassador Deborah Lipstadt explores the nuanced landscape of antisemitism as she delves into the unexpected commonality of antisemitism uniting the right and the left. She exposes how and why antisemitism is found across the ideological spectrum – and how combating it on one side can fuel the fire on the other. 

Out of the darkness: the Germans from 1942 to the present

Public Lecture

29th February, 2024

Out of the darkness: the Germans from 1942 to the present

Frank Trentmann, Birkbeck, University of London, and the University of Helsinki

In this talk, Professor Frank Trentmann draws on his new book, ‘Out of the Darkness’, to put current developments in historical perspective. Through this book, he seeks to answer a central question: How have the Germans changed since 1942 and why? And who are they now?

Antisemitism and racism: a shared history

Seminar | For Scholars

6th March, 2024

Antisemitism and racism: a shared history

Magda Teter, Fordham University

In this talk, Magda Teter, the author of ‘Christian Supremacy: Reckoning with the Roots of Antisemitism and Racism’, will explore the interplay between Christian theology and law that led to the creation of social hierarchies, legal exclusion of and a denial of equality to Jews and Black people. She will argue that this troubling legacy still haunts us today. 

Gaza in the Israeli imagination – between repression and longing

Public Lecture

12th March, 2024

Gaza in the Israeli imagination – between repression and longing

Arie M. Dubnov, The George Washington University

In this talk, Professor Arie Dubnov will explore the multifaceted perception of Gaza within Israeli culture, revealing the complex dynamics within Israeli responses to October 7th.  

Decolonizing testimony: Frederick Douglass and Primo Levi

Public Lecture | Birkbeck Arts Week

8th May, 2024

Decolonizing testimony: Frederick Douglass and Primo Levi

Bryan Cheyette, University of Reading

This lecture will bring together the narratives and memories of two suffering groups of people: the victims of the concentration camps and ghettos in Europe and the slave plantations in the American South.

Jewish advocacy and anti-racism: the UN World Conference Against Racism in Durban (2001) and its aftermath

Seminar | For Scholars

29th May, 2024

Jewish advocacy and anti-racism: the UN World Conference Against Racism in Durban (2001) and its aftermath

Emilie Wiedemann, University of Glasgow

In this seminar, Emilie Wiedemann will focus on the preparations for the UN World Conference Against Racism held in September 2001 and the advocacy of diaspora Jewish NGOs within this context.

Ties that bind: kinship, adjacency, and the trans camera

Public Lecture

17th June, 2024

Ties that bind: kinship, adjacency, and the trans camera

Jennifer Evans, Carleton University

In this talk, Professor Evans explores the photography of two middle-aged Jewish women and former refugees, Lisetta Carmi and Madalena Schwarz, who fostered relationships of trust and kinship with the trans communities they photographed.

Neo-Nazi terrorism and countercultural fascism

Public Lecture

20th June, 2024

Neo-Nazi terrorism and countercultural fascism

Spencer Sunshine, independent scholar and author

As the Far Right is on the rise, understanding the worldview of its participants is more important than ever. Based on extensive archival work and interviews, Spencer Sunshine will document the largely unexplored history of America’s contemporary white supremacist and neo-Nazi movements.

Antisemitism in Britain: How has it shaped Jewish identity before and after October 7?

SEMINAR SERIES | ANTISEMITISM NOW

25th June, 2024

Antisemitism in Britain: How has it shaped Jewish identity before and after October 7?

Jonathan Boyd, Institute for Jewish Policy Research

Drawing on quantitative survey data gathered both before and after the October 7 attacks, Jonathan Boyd will discuss the position of Jews in Britain today, how, if at all, they have been impacted by the Hamas-Israel war, and what the future may hold. 

The 1948 Palestine war: from the local to the global

Public Lecture

30th October, 2024

The 1948 Palestine war: from the local to the global

Derek Penslar, Harvard University

Between 1947 and 1949, debates about Palestine within the United Nations pulled dozens of countries into the determination of the land’s fate – national interests and transnational sympathies shaped attitudes towards the partition of Palestine and the ensuing Arab-Israeli war. The war riveted the attention of the world – for reasons that still apply in our own day.

Professor David Feldman, Director – 1

The relationship between antisemitism and other forms of racism and exclusion is not only a historical question. It is an urgent issue for today.

Professor David Feldman, Director

Share Article