Latest Update: Welcome to the website of the Birkbeck Institute for the Study of Antisemitism, formerly the Pears Institute.

ACTIVITY

What's On

The Birkbeck Institute for the Study of Antisemitism holds seminars, workshops and conferences for scholars, and lectures, discussions and film screenings that are open to everyone.

The Idea of Toleration and its Fate in Modernity

25th January, 2011

The Idea of Toleration and its Fate in Modernity

Simon Schama, University Professor of Art History and History, Columbia University

In this panoramic lecture, Simon Schama begins by considering the appeal and significance of Anne Frank and her diary for successive generations.

Survival, Memory and Testimony: Personal Perspectives on the Holocaust

1st February, 2011

Survival, Memory and Testimony: Personal Perspectives on the Holocaust

Freddie Knoller, survivor of Auschwitz and Jean-Marc Dreyfus, Holocaust Historian, University of Manchester

At this important event, Freddie Knoller, survivor of Auschwitz and Jean-Marc Dreyfus, Holocaust Historian, talk about persecution, internment and survival. A public discussion follows.

In Pursuit of the Nazi Mind: Rudolf Hess & his Doctors 1941-1946

16th February, 2011

In Pursuit of the Nazi Mind: Rudolf Hess & his Doctors 1941-1946

Professor Daniel Pick, Birkbeck, University of London

Daniel Pick will talk informally about his current research relating to the formation of Anglo-American psychoanalytic ideas about the Third Reich.

Interpreting Imaginary Jews

17th February, 2011

Interpreting Imaginary Jews

Dr Anthony Bale and Professor John Arnold, Birkbeck, University of London and Dr Nadia Valman, Queen Mary, University of London.

Many medieval Christians believed that Jews committed crimes against Christian children and were out to destroy their religion and way of life. They retaliated with violence of their own, denying Jews the right to religious freedom and peace. Dr Bale’s new book Feeling Persecuted: Christians, Jews and Images of Violence in the Middle Ages exposes […]

Subjectivity as a Site of Struggle: Experiences of Antisemitism in the Israeli Diaspora

10th May, 2011

Subjectivity as a Site of Struggle: Experiences of Antisemitism in the Israeli Diaspora

Professor Tim McNamara, The University of Melbourne, Australia

This paper re-examines some unpublished data from an interview study of Israelis in Melbourne, Australia, describing their encounters, direct and indirect, with the discourse of antisemitism and the counter-discourses they cite in order (desirably) to disarm the significance of such experiences. 

Antisemitism and the Law

11th May, 2011

Antisemitism and the Law

Professor Didi Herman, University of Kent; Professor Maleiha Malik, Kings College London; Dr David Seymour, University of Lancaster

The role religion and race play in determining judicial thinking in England today will be explored in this round-table discussion. It will take as its starting point, Didi Herman’s ground-breaking new book, An Unfortunate Coincidence: Jews, Jewishness and English Law.

Ararat – The Armenian Genocide

13th May, 2011

Ararat – The Armenian Genocide

Dr Ludivine Broch, Birkbeck, University of London

Ararat directed, written, and co-produced by Atom Egoyan is based loosely on the Siege of Van during the Armenian Genocide. In addition to exploring the human impact of this specific historical event, the film examines the nature of truth and its representation through art. Ararat stars Charles Aznavour, Christopher Plummer, and David Alpay (2002).

Bismarck, Antisemitism and the Tragedy of German Jewry

26th May, 2011

Bismarck, Antisemitism and the Tragedy of German Jewry

Jonathan Steinberg, Walter H. Annenberg Professor of Modern European History, University of Pennsylvania

Professor Steinberg will shed new light on the man he describes as, “the most remarkable figure of the 19th century….a political genius who combined creative and destructive traits, generosity and pettiness, tolerance and ferocious enmity…”.

The Killing Fields – Cambodia and Genocide

10th June, 2011

The Killing Fields – Cambodia and Genocide

Dr Ludivine Broch, Birkbeck, University of London

Is it possible to represent the greatest crimes of the 20th century in film? The Killing Fields is about the Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia, based on the experiences of two journalists. A reflection on artists’ responsibilities and discussion on some of the controversies of representing genocide in film.

The Politics of Demonization – Symposium

21st June, 2011

The Politics of Demonization – Symposium

Gilbert Achcar, SOAS, University of London; Robert Fine, University of Warwick; Jeremy Krikler, University of Essex; Keith McClelland, University College London; Colin Shindler, SOAS, University of London; Robert Singh, Birkbeck, University of London.

This symposium attempts to foster debate and promote a conversation. We aim to consider the broad politics of demonization and within this context better understand aspects of contemporary debate on Israel.

Antisemitism Workshop

19th September, 2011

Antisemitism Workshop

David Feldman, Director, Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism, Birkbeck, University of London; Scott Ury, Head, Stephen Roth Institute for the Study of Contemporary Antisemitism and Racism, Tel Aviv University

Scholarly work has often suffered from the politicisation of antisemitism, being on occasion corralled – both by scholars and their audiences – for political ends. The aim of this workshop is to focus on ways in which we can collectively push the study of antisemitism forward.

Fighting Together for a Better Past: the Story of Cable Street

10th October, 2011

Fighting Together for a Better Past: the Story of Cable Street

Professor Tony Kushner, Parkes Institute, University of Southampton; Dr Nadia Valman, Queen Mary, University of London; David Rosenberg, teacher, writer and guide.

75 Years after the event, the Battle of Cable Street maintains its mythical status. Yet it now seems to have a life of its own, interpreted according to social class, political affiliation and cultural background. Was it a Jewish victory? A working class triumph? How was it understood by following generations?

After the Holocaust: Challenging the Myth of Silence

7th November, 2011

After the Holocaust: Challenging the Myth of Silence

Professor David Cesarani, Royal Holloway, University of London; Professor Mary Fulbrook, University College London; Dr Eva Hoffman, Kingston University

Taking David Cesarani’s book as the starting point, Mary Fulbrook, and Eva Hoffman, whose writings have explored memory, history and the legacy of the Holocaust, will discuss the evidence for ‘silence’ and probe the counter-evidence.

Defending the Indefensible: Reflections on the Anglo-Jewish Reaction to Domestic Antisemitism, 1931 – 1940

6th December, 2011

Defending the Indefensible: Reflections on the Anglo-Jewish Reaction to Domestic Antisemitism, 1931 – 1940

Professor Geoffrey Alderman, The University of Buckingham

Using a variety of archival sources – including those originating from within fascist circles – Professor Alderman will trace the evolution of this idiosyncratic defence policy and attempt to judge its validity.

Professor David Feldman, Director – 2

In an age of populism and nationalism it is more important than ever to understand the connections between antisemitism and other forms of racialization.

Professor David Feldman, Director

Share Article